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Iceland’s Vikings

Page history last edited by James Arrick 10 years, 9 months ago

One could easily look at a small Midwestern American town and be able to extract values, traditions, and a general understanding of American people. This is what I plan to do with Iceland. In order to paint a picture of the Viking people and understand their true context in history, I will look at Iceland’s past and present.

 

Waterfall

Icelandic identity and history is a microcosm for the Viking world. A look into Icelandic identity or nationalism and its history paints a picture of Viking culture, everyday life, commerce, governance, and core values.

We can look at Iceland’s past and the present to see refined Viking ideals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Historyand Timeline: about 5-7 pages worth

 

 

 

 

 


 

Agriculture, Travel, Commerce 5-7

 

Due to the fact that Iceland’s climate is so extreme, one must mention what Iceland had to trade with the rest of the Viking world when talking about what agriculture categories exists in Iceland. A study of Iceland’s agriculture necessitates understanding what was traded to them in the rest of the Viking world.

The BBC has a great lesson on Viking trade and exploration that include annotated picture and videos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

Forest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 


 

Annotated Bibliography

 

 

1.              Haywood, John. The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Vikings. Harmondsworth Eng.: Penguin, 1995.

Note: Here I will pull a lot of information and pictures if possible. Not only does this book discribe in detail the history of the Viking world, but it also provides links to other sources found on the Internet. I will use this as the backbone to many of the historical fact about the Viking world. I will also use it to compare Iceland to the rest of the Viking world.

 

 

 

 

2.              Pálsson, Hermann. Hrafnkel's Saga and Other Icelandic Stories. Harmondsworth Eng.: Penguin, 1971.

Note: This saga will provide many scenes by which I can paint a picture of everyday life in Iceland. Not only will I be able to direct everyone that reads the report to a specific manual that paints a picture of the every day, easotaric life of the historic Icelander but this book will be especially applicable to those who take The Viking World class.

 

 

3.              Sturluson, Snorri et.al. King Harald's Saga. Harmondsworth Eng.: Penguin, 1966.

This story is primarily going to be used to show the ability of a Viking to move around the globe. It will be used in reference to present the issues of trade and travel I present in the project.

 

 

4.              Haine, Thomas. , What did the Viking discoverers of America know of the North Atlantic Environment?: The John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218–2682, USA, 2008.

This research article is an excellent source of historic and present day environmental conditions in the northern Atlantic and by extension Iceland. From this article I will pull many current fact and figure, assured to be the boring parts of the research project.

 

 

5.              Black, Ron. Hurstwic: http://www.hurstwic.org/index.html, 1999 – 2009

This is an awesome site that looks at reenacting for fun, for history telling and for research. I will be pulling from many of the food recipes and building projects they cover on this site. I will also attempt to connect the project performed on this site to any other web sites that follow up on the topic covered.

 

6.              Skarsdt̤tir, Svanhildur et.al. Egil's Saga. New York: Penguin Books, 2004.

This Saga falls under the same description as Hrafnkel's Saga, #2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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